Purrfect Talker

 

Author: Deanna Chesnut, Author, Purrs & Promises

The Secret Shopper- Part II

(Continued). The shopping is going well—we’ve been to Dollar Store and Big Lots and loaded up with great bargains in quality food and treats, toys, and “bundler beds.” On our list for today: new food for Birdie, great cat litter, and my magic flowers.

I used to feed dry food because it was easy and convenient and I had a very erratic schedule; the cats loved it. Then one of the cats had problems eating, and for several years, all I fed was wet food and we were happy. Alas, I lost the sick kitty, and soon Birdie, my 10-year old tabby decided it was kibble or nothing. (No, cats won’t starve themselves to death, but they can and do refuse to eat for so long it can cause physical issues. (On another day, we’ll discuss the wet-dry food controversy.)

Pet Smart’s cat section has more shelves than the grocery store that fed the population of 5,000 in my hometown. I stand overwhelmed at more cat food than the food as sold at the grocery store in my childhood home of 5,000 humans. I begin picking up bags and reading. At one time, I knew whether every ingredient was good or bad, but now there are too many–one bag has 29 lines of additives. I finally just grab a couple of the smallest bags I could find, new to me; the one with only 23 lines.  

One is Muse, from Purina–better I snobbishly think, than the foods made by cleaning product companies like Proctor and Gamble, etc. My experiment later goes like this: I place a few nuggets from each bag at the 10-2-6 positions on a plate and call Birdie. She zooms in on the Muse and chows down, totally ignoring the other two brands. Since then, in the month I’ve had her on Muse, her coat has gotten softer, she has slimmed down a bit. She no longer eats “gluttonously,” but instead eats a bit, then quits. She’s only presented me with one hairball vomit, a record for her. So I’m sticking with Muse because I haven’t seen any ill effects, and overall, she seems healthier—although it could be all the attention from now being an “only” child.   MUSE  https://www.musecatfood.com/products/dry-recipes/

Next stop: Wal-Mart, the only place to get Mimi’s litter. I’ve been using Mimi’s for years, almost exclusively. A few years after I started, there was a contract dispute and Mimi disappeared.  Oh, there was a horrible uproar on the Internet with upset hoomans. Yes, it’s that good! It’s a silica gel at 1/3 the price of other brands, $4.32 for a 4-lb. easy-to-lift bag. I get about 3 weeks a bag for one cat. When it starts to smell, change it! It’s very effective at odor control, and has no odor of its own. One cat had diabetes and drank excessively; I had to go to a scoopable litter, which needed a full change every other day-$$$. Except for that, all of my cats have been fine with it, though they tend not to bury the poops—which have no smell, just look like an overflowing ash tray. General rule of thumb: every 1.5 cats needs a box, e.g., two cats, three boxes.  We’ll talk more about litter box etiquette and issues another day.  Mimi review:  https://www.walmart.com/reviews/product/12018928

Oh dear. I apologize; I’ve exceeded my word allotment again, and we’ve not shopped for my #1 item in my first aid cabinet. It will be our first stop next week, I promise! I’ll devote the whole blog to what’s in those little bottles. Hint: it’s not my #2 favorite—essential oils, but is good for every living thing. You won’t want to miss my blog, “Mystery Flowers” about my favorite product for people, pets and even plants. Put a little extra $ in your next week’s budget—this will  definitely be on your next shopping list.